New Testament Use of the Old Testament

No subject is perhaps more important for the understanding of the Christian faith than the New Testament use of the Old.  Considering the one thousand or more quotations and/or allusions to the OT in the New, this topic represents one of the most complex and challenging areas of biblical studies. Indeed, Jesus and the NT writers apply the OT in diverse, fascinating, and, at times, remarkably innovative ways. For example, why does Matthew 2:18 view Jeremiah 31:15 as a prophecy of Herod’s slaying of innocent babies, while Jeremiah’s words obviously relate to the Babylonian invasion of Judea? How could Matthew interpret Hosea’s prophecy, “Out of Egypt I have called my son,” as applying to Jesus, when the OT prophet clearly understood this as speaking of Israel?  Moreover, does the NT writers’ use of the OT evidence a fundamental continuity or discontinuity between the two Testaments and what are the practical implications for teaching and preaching?

For answers to these and related questions, come join Dr. Huss for an engaging journey through the Scriptures as we consider how Jesus and the NT writers understood and applied the OT Scriptures.

NT775/NT775TM New Testament Use of the Old Testament taught by Dr. Al Huss will be offered July 18-22, 2011. Class size is limited, so interested students are encouraged to sign up quickly before the class fills up. See the full Summer 2011 Schedule as well as the Registration form for more information and details.

About Al Huss
I am a professor of New Testament at Calvary Baptist Seminary in Lansdale, PA

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